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Green-Go supports wrestling show in Zurich

28/05/2020

GLPs Fusion-Scheinwerfer beleuchten „Hercules“-Musical im Central Park

27/05/2020

Horizon 2020 Friday Night Party lit with Robe

27/05/2020

Calibre equips Motu stand at NAMM show

27/05/2020

Hippotizer used for Cyber-Gen ShockWave Tour

25/05/2020

D&B GSL Series on the road with Slipknot

15/05/2020

Robe fixtures on tour with Véronic DiCaire

11/05/2020

High Output uses Hippotizer for Boston’s Shimmer winter party

11/05/2020

Ken Billington selcts Vari-Lite VLZ for ‘Dreamgirls’

07/05/2020

PWL lights WEGA Global Games opening ceremony in Doha

21/04/2020

‘Amélie the Musical’ lit with Robe T1 Profiles

21/04/2020

Corona: Uebel & Gefährlich sorgt mit Chauvet für Clubatmosphäre im Wohnzimmer

20/04/2020

Green Hippo drives visuals for Spotify’s Who We Be Live

20/04/2020

Robe Esprites chosen for Vridilo Je Show in Croatia

17/04/2020

WI Creations flies and moves ski lift for Moose Bar XXL

16/04/2020

Christie Lites delivers lighting and crew for Cisco Live 2020

15/04/2020

Robe Esprites supplied to InfoSys Confluence event in Melbourne

15/04/2020

Corona: Events United and Chauvet enhance Central Church Easter services for streaming

15/04/2020

Junior ESC mit TurboRays von High End Systems

23/03/2020

Innovative Show Design’s Elation rig at College Football Awards on ESPN

23/03/2020

Robe sponsors Signal Festival of Digital Arts

19/03/2020

Painting with Light supports Wintergloed event in Bruges

16/03/2020

Barco projectors and Modulo Pi media servers create New Year’s Eve show in Paris

13/03/2020

Ayrton Perseo supports Castle of Light in Edinburgh

12/03/2020

Lightswitch, 4Wall and Elation team up at LA Auto Show

12/03/2020

Green-Go supports wrestling show in Zurich

Green-Go supports wrestling show in Zurich

Stagelight provided a Green-Go event comms solution as part of the full technical production package for a professional wrestling show at Zurich’s multi-purpose Hallenstadion earlier this year.

 

With the show production built around the central wrestling ring, Stagelight’s team designed a 360° sound system on a completely flown rig, with no ground support to block the all-important sightlines. With four followspot positions located high in the stands surrounding the ring, the intercom solution had to be distributed to the furthest reaches of the venue, via both wired and wireless beltpacks.

 

The system fielded by Stagelight was part of an investment with Green-Go’s Swiss distribution partner, Zap Audio. It consisted of one MCXD Multi-Channel Desk unit as a management station, with ten BPX wired beltpacks and seven WBPX wireless beltpacks, plus two wireless antennas to cover the site. In all, 19 users were connected to the system.

 

Stagelight’s Michael Dünki was responsible for the event’s technical coordination and comms. “Careful preparation - in labelling of beltpacks, readying settings within the software and planning cable runs in advance - saved valuable time on-site,” he says. “The ability to spot-check connections by trying them the day before the show gave us further confidence in the system.”

 

(Photo: Stagelight)

 

www.elclighting.com

www.greengodigital.com

 

GLPs Fusion-Scheinwerfer beleuchten „Hercules“-Musical im Central Park

GLPs Fusion-Scheinwerfer beleuchten „Hercules“-Musical im Central Park
GLPs Fusion-Scheinwerfer beleuchten „Hercules“-Musical im Central Park

Lichtdesigner Tyler Micoleau hat für das Public-Works-Programm des New Yorker Public Theater das Musical „Hercules“ beleuchtet. Der gleichnamige Disney-Film wurde für diese Weltpremiere in Zusammenarbeit zwischen dem Public Theater und Disney Theatrical Productions in ein Bühnen-Musical verwandelt.

 

Als Veranstaltungsort wurde das Delacorte Theater im New Yorker Central Park gewählt. Um das gewünschte Ergebnis zu erzielen, setzte Micoleau neben dem Standardmaterial des Repertoire-Theaters 34 Fusion-FP7-Par-Scheinwerfer und zwanzig Fusion-FS10-Sticks von GLP ein.

 

„Musicals sind nicht die typische Produktion im Delacorte Theater“, erklärt Micoleau. „Ich benötigte Ergänzungen zum Standardmaterial des eher geradlinigen Repertoire-Theaters, um die für das Musicaltheater typische Farbveränderung und Dynamik erzeugen zu können. In den letzten Jahren verwendete das Stadttheater einige farbveränderliche LED-Scheinwerfer und einen kleinen Bestand an Moving Lights, diese waren jedoch nicht wetterfest (IP65 oder besser).“

 

Alex Brandt (Leiter der Beleuchtung des Public Theater) und Micoleau untersuchten die zurzeit verfügbaren wetterfesten Scheinwerfer und entschieden sich letztlich für die GLP-Produkte. „Um die Leuchten auch dort in das Set zu integrieren, wo sie nicht abgedeckt werden können, war die IP-Schutzart entscheidend“, so Brandt.

 

Der Bühnenbau war eine aus Holz gebaute Nachbildung einer antiken griechischen Theaterruine. Sie war von den Werkzeugen und Materialien einer zeitgenössischen archäologischen Ausgrabung in Form eines Gerüstes umgeben.

 

Die Fusion Sticks wurden so in die metallischen Fachwerkkonstruktionen des Gerüstes integriert, dass durchgehende lineare Reihen an der Vorderseite entstanden. „Sie zeigten auf das Publikum und gaben mir eine Reihe von LED-Pixeln, die das Bühnenbild verbanden. Die Fusion Pars sorgten für Uplights an der Basis der sechs 8,5 m hohen griechischen Säulen“, so Micoleau.

 

Der Lichtdesigner setzte die Farbmischung des Scheinwerfers für schnelle Schnitte und Überblendungen ein. „Der Strahlengang des FP7 ist mit 6° ziemlich eng, daher war mir die Diffusorlinse für die Beleuchtung der Säulen wichtig“, erklärt er. „Wir haben das Rosco Opti-Sculpt eingesetzt und den Strahl auf ein Oval 40°/60° aufgeweitet.“

 

Die Fusion Sticks konnten wegen der Bühnenstruktur nicht als durchgehende, nahtlose Lichtbänder installiert werden. „Stattdessen mussten wir jeden Fusion Stick einzeln aufhängen, was die segmentierte Natur der Bühnenstruktur unterstrich. Wir entschieden uns dafür, keine Diffusorplatten zu verwenden, da die Linsen gerade über dem Publikum lagen und die LED-Pixel und 6°-Linien gut sichtbar waren.“ Chris McMeen von Christie Lites zeichnete für die Lieferung des Beleuchtungssystems verantwortlich.

 

(Photos: Joan Marcus & Cass Valentin)

 

www.glp.de

 

Horizon 2020 Friday Night Party lit with Robe

Before the Coronavirus pandemic has sent most of the world into lockdown, Canberra, Australia-based technical production and event specialist and rental company Elite Event Technology ensured that Horizon 2020 - a Friday Night Party event that was part of the Australian National University Students’ Association’s annual Orientation Week activities - had lighting and sound for their main stage, including an all-Robe moving light rig.

 

Staged at the Fellows Oval sports ground on the University of Canberra campus in ACT, around 3000 students enjoyed a line-up of young emerging talent from some of Australia’s best ‘ones-to-watch’ music stars. Elite provided a D&B PA system for the event.

 

The lighting rig was based around a festival lighting spec created by headliner Club Sport’s LD Jake Ploss. Elite’s owner and house FOH sound engineer for the night, Darren Russell, took this as a starting point and - in consultation with Ploss - modified elements to make it practical for the event and to fit the 14-metre-wide truck stage.

 

The stage offered 6.5 metres of headroom to its structural gantry, below which Elite flew their four production trusses. Elite’s Blake Watkin operated lighting for all the other bands apart from Club Sport.

 

For the Friday Night Party, six BMFL WashBeams were on the most downstage truss and used for some subtle key lighting and specials. Sixteen BMFL Spots were distributed around the other trusses together with 16 of the 24 x Pointes, with the balance of Pointes on the floor. These other eight Pointes were part of Club Sport’s floor package and were wheeled onto stage on mobile tank trap bases together with some strobes. All the lights were controlled through the GrandMA2 light house console.

 

The stage was positioned and set up the day before the event - on the tarmacked end of the playing fields - so there was enough time to rig lighting and sound and for Blake Watkin to do some pre-programming the night before, getting some basic building blocks into the desk.

 

With no video elements, all the visuality of the performances was down to the lighting. The biggest challenge for Friday Night Party’s lighting was keeping enough smoke and haze in the stage area (which was open on both sides) to enhance beams and effects.

 

Elite Event Technology also provided all the stage risers and blackline for the concert, plus crowd barriers. Darren Russell and the team commissioned and ordered the generators and designed and supplied site-wide power distro infrastructure covering the stage and production plus the entire Fellows Oval field for the concessions.

 

(Photos: Louise Stickland)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Calibre equips Motu stand at NAMM show

Calibre equips Motu stand at NAMM show

To ensure they got noticed at the winter NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) show in Anaheim earlier this year, Motu - an engineering-driven music technology company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts who develop audio software and computer hardware peripherals for audio and video production - turned to Calibre.

 

“We had a theatre vibe to our booth using truss and scrim,” explains Motu marketing director Jim Cooper. “In previous years, we used projection against a wall - but it looked washed out. It was never enough contrast to look good. Plus it was cumbersome to set up and align. We tried upgrading the projector a number of times.”

 

“Then, at Prolight + Sound 2019, at the Calibre booth, I saw the Calibre AiO,” he continues. “The Calibre booth staff let us connect our laptop to the LEDFusion A130 AiO display, allowing us to see how Motu’s software would look at the AiO’s native resolution.”

 

Calibre’s Paul Wilson then supported Motu at NAMM. “I was able to get Motu up and running with the LEDFusion 130 so that they were able to connect their Mac Pro and laptops and start running through their presentations,” he says. “I was talking to Paul, and next year we’ll plan to use the 163-inch AiO screen to give us even more of a presence.”

 

www.calibreuk.com

 

Calibre equips Motu stand at NAMM showCalibre equips Motu stand at NAMM show

Hippotizer used for Cyber-Gen ShockWave Tour

Hippotizer used for Cyber-Gen ShockWave Tour
Hippotizer used for Cyber-Gen ShockWave Tour

Hippotizer Media Servers were chosen to drive the visuals for the 2019 Cyber-Gen Shock Wave Tour. Featuring a line-up of Deutsch-rap and R&B artists signed to the Cyber-Gen music label, the tour played dates in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

 

Lighting designer Otto Schildknecht asked Emanuel Jörgner to programme and operate the show’s video and lighting elements. “Because we needed a high performance server, which would ensure all the live notch FX ran smoothly, we chose the Boreal+,” says Jörgner. “The other good reason for choosing the Boreal+ was the fact that we could deform the content with the FX library.”

 

The display setup consisted of a 8 m x 2.3 m, 16 mm pixel pitch LED wall positioned upstage, with alternative configurations for shows in the smaller venues on the tour. “Besides the LED wall, we integrated eight Astera AX-1 PixelTubes on each side of the screen,” explains Jörgner. “In special parts of the show we used the Hippotizer’s PixelMapper to map the video content to the PixelTubes.” Jörgner merged ArtNet data from both the Boreal+ unit and the lighting console to control the PixelTubes.

 

In addition, the stage set featured custom-made cubes of 4 mm pixel pitch LED panels. Each visible surface was mapped with a variety of video content and effects, while content was also fed to the top sides of the cubes for a complementary uplight effect.

 

The visual content consisted of a mix of music videos and individual clips provided by the artists. Both video and lighting were mostly triggered by SMPTE timecode. However, the Media Servers were connected separately from the lighting console, which Jörgner says was useful in enabling the flexibility required for such a video and light show, with both synchronous and independent elements.

 

(Photos: Rainer Clasani/Emanuel Jörgner)

 

www.green-hippo.com

 

D&B GSL Series on the road with Slipknot

Chase Usry, Systems Engineer for Eighth Day Sound, has been working on U.S. metal band Slipknot’s latest European tour. He explains that with such a loud heavy metal act, the low mid-range is critical for making the desired hard-hitting sound.

 

“Heavy metal needs to come out as a full sound that is aggressive and powerful, and if the sound system doesn’t have the lower region it will lack the proper feel and will turn into a mess fast,” says Usry. “To meet these demanding audio requirements, we decided to go with the GSL system from D&B Audiotechnik for our current leg of the tour.“

 

The GSL system is the biggest line array in the D&B SL-Series, specifically designed for large-scale sound reinforcement. Up to twenty-four GSL12 or GSL8 loudspeakers can be flown in vertical columns producing a 120° or 80° constant directivity dispersion pattern in the horizontal plane respectively.

 

The loudspeakers are driven actively by two channels of a D&B amplifier, one channel powering the L.F. drivers, the second channel powers all other components, these are passively crossed-over. Due to the arrangement of the front and side-firing L.F. drivers, accurate directivity control is maintained from 45 Hz to above 18 kHz.

 

The standard Slipknot sound system for this tour comprised of: Main - 14 GSL8 and 4 GSL12 per side; Side - 16 KSL8 per side; Flown Sub - 6 SL Sub per side; Ground Sub - 12 SL Sub; Front Fills - 8 Y10P; Center Fills - 2 V7P; Wedges - 10 M4s.

 

www.dbaudio.com

 

Robe fixtures on tour with Véronic DiCaire

Robe fixtures on tour with Véronic DiCaire
Robe fixtures on tour with Véronic DiCaire

Montreal-based visual design practice Luz Studio, headed by Matthieu Larivée, created the production design at the core of French-Canadian singer and impressionist Véronic DiCaire’s current ‘Showgirl’ tour, which was launched in Canada in December 2019, then toured arenas in Europe, before the Coronavirus pandemic took hold and curtailed all live events until the curve is flattened.

 

The ‘Showgirl’ concept saw the artist delivering material written/performed by around 50 iconic female vocalists in their style and voices, backed by six dancers and four musicians. Larivée proposed an integrated set, lighting and video design which featured Robe moving lights at the center, with 28 x MegaPointes and 12 x Spiiders, plus six BMFL Blades and two BMFL Spots being used with a RoboSpot remote follow-spotting system.

 

The stage architecture was defined by five distinctive LED columns onstage, a central flat-plane LED surface flanked by four 3-sided columns with the four musicians in the middle, which allowed them to be concealed and revealed as desired.

 

Larivée worked closely with the artist herself and her creative team including show director Josée Fortier, choreography/stage director Geneviève Dorion-Coupal and artistic director Patricia Ruel. He also collaborated closely with Pierre Martinez (lighting director on the last tour) and asked him onboard again in the same role.

 

The basic starting point for lighting the show was the band on stage. Each musician was positioned on an 8 ft x 8 ft riser, which DiCaire wanted visible - or not - throughout the set, so the first task was integrating these risers slickly into the stage design. Utilizing blow-through screen with no PSU was the first phase of dealing with the “invisibility puzzle”. DiCaire’s mood boards for the show demanded graphic-style lighting, with LED appearing in dramatic bold strips at times, contrasted, combined and enrichened with matching lighting looks.

 

The MegaPointes were mainly positioned on the overhead rig in a V-shaped configuration, and on two vertically hung drop-bars either side of the center screen. They produced the desired looks either by pointing directly downwards or being zoomed out very wide to light the screen structures. No gobos were used, but the beams and colors were fully maximized.

 

Six of the 12 Spiiders lived on the most downstage overhead truss or LX fly bar, with 6 on the floor in the offstage footlights position for front lighting and washing across the stage in a range of colors. All six BMFL Blades were rigged on the downstage truss where they doubled for front lighting and could be swung round to illuminate the audience. The two BMFL Spots on the RoboSpot system were also on the front truss. Pierre Martinez ran the show lighting on a GrandMA console.

 

Some custom fixtures were added to help create specific effects, including wireless gloves with lights held by the dancers during the opening sequence. Matthieu Larivée also had some special 2-meter mappable LED tubes built which are fully seamless and were carried, lightsaber-style, by the dancers during one of the medleys. Lighting and video equipment for the tour was supplied worldwide by Solotech.

 

(Photos: Claude Dufresne)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Robe fixtures on tour with Véronic DiCaireRobe fixtures on tour with Véronic DiCaire

High Output uses Hippotizer for Boston’s Shimmer winter party

High Output uses Hippotizer for Boston’s Shimmer winter party

Supplier High Output, Inc. recently chose a Hippotizer Karst+ Media Server to control the visuals for the Boston Center for the Arts (BCA) 2020 winter party, Shimmer.

 

The event, themed on the early-2000s, showcased live fashion shoots, dance performances and a DJ set, as well as large-scale visual art installations in support of BCA’s artist residency programs. The artistic content was curated by visual artist and film-maker Ethan Vogt.

 

High Output’s Nick Venti, Video Lead for the event, was responsible for running and shaping the video content for the event, which featured an unusually-shaped vertical projection surface - an 8 ft (2.4 m) wide x 20 ft (6 m) tall screen which served as the backdrop to the 38 ft (11.6 m) long runway ran through the middle of the action in BCA’s Cyclorama venue.

 

Venti used the Hippotizer Karst+ Media Server to run stock digital gobo content, projected from a Barco F90-W13 projector onto the runway backdrop, overlaying the multicoloured lighting which played over the surface, to create an animated, ‘shimmering’ effect.

 

“I was only using one layer of content,” says Venti. “I used some of the Hippotizer’s geometry controls to size the content and I created a custom mask with Shape (a toolkit used for all aligning, warping, blending and masking tasks) to eliminate overshoot, which would have been impossible with the projector alone. We didn’t know what type of video content would be provided by the client, so the Hippotizer helped with quickly fitting the content to the unusual size of the banner.”

 

(Photo: Melissa Blackall)

 

www.green-hippo.com

 

Ken Billington selcts Vari-Lite VLZ for ‘Dreamgirls’

Broadway lighting designer Ken Billington included 66 of Vari-Lite’s LED-based VLZ fixtures in his lighting rig for the latest touring production of ‘Dreamgirls’, a show he first lit in 2008. “I needed to reproduce the lighting for this production, which was using the same scenery, costumes and direction as eleven years earlier,” Billington explains his selection of the VLZ fixture family. “Equipment has changed and what we used originally, VL2500 Wash, VL3000 Spot, VL3500 Spot and color scrollers are no longer available - and if they are, they’re old and unreliable.”

 

After seeing a demo of the fixture, Billington accepted the VLZs as the next generation fixtures that would bring the desired continuity to the new production. “The main challenge was to reproduce this show exactly as it had been done before,” he says.

 

In total Billington specified 32 VLZ Wash, 22 VLZ Spot and 12 VLZ Profile fixtures. “The VLZ package forms the entire overhead lighting rig for the show,” says his associate lighting designer, Ben Travis. “Back light, top light, pipe ends, specials - all VLZ. Then, conventional and LED ellipsoidals take care of side-light and front-light.”

 

(Photos: Tsuyoshi Toya/Tokyo Broadcasting System Television, Inc.)

 

www.signify.com

 

PWL lights WEGA Global Games opening ceremony in Doha

Painting with Light (PWL)’s creative director Luc Peumans was asked to design a lighting scheme for the opening ceremony (OC) of the first Qatar eSports WEGA Global Games. The OC event was staged in the Khalifa Stadium in Doha and attended by 14,000 eSports fans.

 

Show artistic director Steven Martin from The Cintamani Stone: Architect of Emotion (TCS-AOE) asked Peumans onboard for their pitch, and they were awarded the project by Doha-based event company The Planners LLC. The all-Belgium technical design and imagineering team also included OC technical director Ludo Vanstreels from Trimex.

 

Challenges for Peumans’ lighting design included the positioning of the stage in one section down the long end of the stadium, which meant that the whole lighting rig - and all other technical elements - had to be ground supported.

 

Integral to the winning pitch were projections mapped onto the stage floor and holographic images beamed on a special 30-metre-wide by 12-metre-high scrim - currently a trending aesthetic in the world of eSport tournament OCs. These had to be carefully ‘lit around’, combined with several flying and ground-based cast members and performers. Large amounts of video and LED screens to generally contend with were additional challenges for lighting.

 

Peumans’ design for the 25-minute show was based around seven 16-metre-high towers, three upstage and four downstage to the sides to provide a sense of depth and a basic structural framework around the 80-meter-wide oval-shaped performance space. These towers also served as lighting positions. Upstage was the 1000 plus square metre, 12-metre-high back video wall. The stage surface was mapped for projections and the holographic images were beamed onto special holo-scrims.

 

Peumans chose 100 Robe MegaPointes as his main effects lighting fixtures. These were distributed on different levels of all seven towers, as well as along the top edge of the video wall at the back and scattered on the stage deck, giving three layers of optical attack. This was needed to work with the combination of VR and cast, including the flying characters, dancers and holographic images all integrated in the collage of visuals. Peumans created a series of special looks with the MegaPointes to compliment the holographic characters.

 

Lighting was supplied - along with audio, LED screen, ground support trussing, vari-speed motors for performer flying, general rigging and trussing - by the Doha branch of MediaPro International who also built the stage. The stage was built by The Planners’ in-house decor team.

 

In addition to the MegaPointes, there were 60 x Robe Spiider LED wash beams, 36 x Cyclops LED washes, 50 x Claypaky Mythos and 42 CP Scenius Unicos which were used to highlight cast positions from the sides and for illuminating specific parts of the projection areas.

 

Much of the general lighting came from the sides as front lighting was minimal - just four fixtures - so not to spill onto the holo-scrims. Claypaky Stormy LED strobes plus beam lights and a variety of other available fixtures all added up to over 500 light sources. Programming was done by Peumans’ associate LD Raphael Demonthy and lighting programmer Sebastian Huwig on site, using GrandMA2 consoles.

 

Due to the short turnaround time, once the initial design proposals were accepted, Peumans WYSIWYG’d the stage and lighting in PWL’s studio in Genk, Belgium. A site visit was not possible for Peumans in the timeframe, however, Ludo Vanstreels, Steven Martin and Jo Pauly from Visual Solutions all visited, and Martin’s team produced a complete mock-up and storyboard of the show with soundtrack.

 

The video elements were assembled, coordinated and controlled by Jo Pauly, the video content was created by Pix & Real and Prismax. Music was compiled by Tino Plettinck with the support of Universal Production Music. A team of about 40 performing talents and five show runners were flown in with the TCS team.

 

(Photos: The Cintamani Stone: Architect of Emotion - TCS-AOE)

 

www.paintingwithlight.com

 

‘Amélie the Musical’ lit with Robe T1 Profiles

Elliot Griggs chose Robe’s T1 Profiles to provide major key lighting for ‘Amélie the Musical’, a new production first staged at the Watermill Theatre, Newbury, UK, which then undertook a nationwide UK and Irish tour and afterwards played at The Other Palace in London.

 

Griggs was asked to light the show, directed by Michael Fentiman and based on the 2001 French art-house romantic comedy film ‘Amélie’.  The T1 Profiles - used in addition to the touring lighting rigs at each venue on the tour - were supplied by theatrical rental company White Light, investing in their first T1s for this production.

 

They were used as front light and usually positioned on the front-of-circle bar. In most venues, this meant they would be right above and in close proximity to the audience, so silent running was essential.

 

Many scenes took place on the Paris Metro, so this required Griggs to create video style projection effects to simulate passing trains, and again the T1 provided a solution. “The look was achieved using the shuttering in conjunction with the animation wheel,” says Griggs.

 

The fixtures also had to create some authentic full stage projections. The lead character (played by French Canadian actress Audrey Brisson) wore a lot of red so Griggs crafted several lighting colour schemes to be monochrome-based allowing the costumes to pop.

 

Initially, there were more Robes on the design, but some re-engineering was required to fit the budget. Griggs programmed the lighting on an ETC Eos console at the Watermill.

 

(Photos: Pamela Raith)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Corona: Uebel & Gefährlich sorgt mit Chauvet für Clubatmosphäre im Wohnzimmer

Bereits Mitte März 2020 startete in Berlin das Projekt United We Stream. In Zusammenarbeit mit Arte Concert entstand der größte virtuelle Club der Welt, der die Atmosphäre der Nacht in die Wohnzimmer der Zuschauer bringen und die jeweiligen Clubs, Künstler und Veranstalter unterstützen soll.

 

Anfang April ging United We Stream Global an den Start, wo sich weitere Städte und Regionen Deutschlands und Europas anschließen, um auch außerhalb Berlins auf lokale Funding-Kampagnen hinzuweisen.

 

Den Anfang der Expansion machte der Hamburger Club Uebel & Gefährlich, den der bundesweite Shut Down der gegenwärtigen Clubkultur auch getroffen hat. „Wie viele andere in unserer Branche ist auch die Hamburger Club- und Veranstalterszene durch diese Situation in ihrer Existenz und Vielfalt bedroht“, sagt Melina Koliofotos vom Uebel & Gefährlich. „Um ein Club- und Kultursterben unbekannten Ausmaßes zu verhindern, müssen wir jetzt handeln.“

 

Deswegen startete das Clubkombinat Hamburg in Kooperation mit der Stiftung zur Stärkung privater Musikbühnen Hamburg (Clubstiftung) eine Spendenaktion, für die der Zusammenschluss mit der Initiative United We Stream aufmerksam machen soll. Weitere Aktionen sollen folgen, laut Aussage der Veranstalter hat sich ein großer Zusammenhalt zwischen Clubs und Künstlern ergeben.

 

Für den Stream brachte das Team unter Leitung der Lichtdesignerin Sylvia „Koyo“ Tara ein Setup aus Scheinwerfern von Chauvet Professional zum Einsatz. Ein großes kreuzähnliches Konstrukt schwebte während der Streams hinter den auftretenden DJs.

 

Realisiert wurde diese Formation mit insgesamt zwölf Fixtures aus der Épix-Strip-IP-Reihe, angesteuert vom hauseigenen VJ Mateo über die Videosoftware Resolume. Durch die unterschiedliche Positionierung konnten - je nach Content - verschiedene Effekte erzeugt werden. „Zwar sind sie fest verbaute Fixtures, in dieser Positionierung wirkten sie aber für den Zuschauer sehr flexibel und beweglich“, so Tara.

 

Bei der Grundidee sei es der in Hamburg beheimateten Lichtkünstlerin darum gegangen, die Größe des Uebel & Gefährlich im leeren Zustand zu inszenieren. Ein großer Smiley diente als alleiniger Gast. „Natürlich ist es im ersten Moment sehr ungewohnt, das Licht für einen ‚leeren Raum‘ zu konzipieren“, erklärt Tara. „Ich musste viel mehr darauf achten, dass die Lichtstimmungen auch von der Kamera eingefangen werden können. Dafür hatte ich immer den Vorschaumonitor im Blick, um selbst zu sehen, was die Kamera gerade sieht. Letztere sollte und durfte für mich nicht ins Schwarze schauen, was gerade in dieser Anwendung komisch klingt. Schließlich ist es bei Technopartys eher umgekehrt. Da gilt ja: ‚Schwarz ist auch eine Farbe‘.“

 

Neben den Épix Strips (8x Épix Strip IP, 4x Épix Strip IP 50) dienten zwei Rogue R3 Spots und sechs Rogue R1 Beams zur Ausleuchtung und dazu, die Atmosphäre zu setzen. Zwei Maverick MK Pyxis kamen während der insgesamt vierstündigen Show ebenfalls zum Einsatz wie ein Épix Drive 2000 IP.

 

(Fotos: Dennis Poser)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.eu

www.unitedwestream.hamburg

www.uebelundgefaehrlich.com

 

Chauvet

Green Hippo drives visuals for Spotify’s Who We Be Live

Green Hippo drives visuals for Spotify’s Who We Be Live

Green Hippo’s Hippotizer Media Servers were chosen by video director Jay Baker of Creative Video Design to drive the visuals for Spotify Presents: Who We Be Live 2019. Performed live at the O2 Victoria Warehouse in Manchester, the Spotify show was part of its series of events featuring the UK and Ireland’s leading Rap, Grime, R&B and Afrobeat line-ups.

 

Creative design and production was by UK marketing agency Amplify, working closely with event promoter SJM Concerts. Creative Video Design was brought into the project by Production Box, led by Mike Oates.

 

While the venue’s exterior was used as a projection surface on which lighting designer Jon Trincas created some suitably grungy looks, the stage set inside was designed with a grunge/grime warehouse theme. “Our main challenge,” Baker explains, “was to create multiple different looks for the many artists performing, including mapping their own 16:9 format content to screens that were in no way 16:9.”

 

Baker used Hippotizer Karst+ Media Servers, supplied by 80Six Ltd, as the main playback and backup devices, with timecode playback rig provided by SFL. Baker had real-time access to parameters via Green Hippo’s ZooKeeper interface from front-of-house. “Before the event, we also made use of the Hippotizer Prep dongle at our studio,” says Baker, “which enabled us to prepare the pixelmap setup before we arrived on site.”

 

For the performance, Baker and his Karst+ delivered visuals designed in-house by Creative Video Design, as well as stings and ident content from Amplify, onto LED screens consisting of ROE Visual’s CB3 and semi-transparent Vanish V8 screen modules, also from 80Six Ltd.

 

“We were adding texture to the show, with three large chevron screens onstage and a scattered pattern of individual panels on the upstage scaffold structure,” says Baker. “We also created Imag effects for the chevron screens using the Hippo’s Notch integration.”

 

(Photo: Jay Baker)

 

www.green-hippo.com

 

Robe Esprites chosen for Vridilo Je Show in Croatia

Robe Esprites chosen for Vridilo Je Show in Croatia
Robe Esprites chosen for Vridilo Je Show in Croatia

The Vridilo Je show was a tribute concert in Spilt Arena, Croatia, starring the Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra (ZPO) and dedicated to the late Croatian singer/entertainer Oliver Dragojevic, who passed in 2018 following a career spanning over fifty years.

 

The event was organised by his family, management, and record label. Lighting designer Sven Kucinic used the opportunity to specify Robe’s new Esprite LED spot moving lights for the first time, 24 of which were delivered the day before to Croatian rental company Eldra which supplied lighting and video equipment for the concert.

 

Kucinic was asked to design lighting and set by the record company, having worked with Dragojevic on numerous occasions both live and on television and internationally in recent years. He worked closely on the overall show design with video designer and creative director Lea Dekleva.

 

The ZPO was conducted by maestro Alan Bjelinski and joined by the Izvor Choir who also worked regularly with Dragojevic on his shows in recent years. There was also a band plus an array of guest vocalists. The trussing design was a conventional straight truss setup which enabled Kucinic to rig the lighting fixtures at specific angles to the artists so they were asymmetrical.

 

The Esprites were the backbone of the lighting system. They added some virtual scenography by creating a dynamic lighting backdrop that changed shape and colour as well as being used as key lights for the different groups of performers onstage - soloists, band, choir, orchestra.

 

Also on the rig for this concert were 32 x Robe LEDWash 600+s and 20 x MMX WashBeams which were the main and only front lighting, and they worked together with strobes, blinders, some beam moving lights and some large LED washes.

 

Kucinic programmed and ran the show using a GrandMA3 full size console. His chief lighting technician was Zvonimir Borovac, and the sound engineers for the show were Dejan Krošelj (FOH) and Bruno Molnar who took care of the orchestral mix.

 

Video content appearing on the main two onstage screens was a visual focus of the show, with a mix of remastered archive material from the life and career of Dragojevic that was coordinated by Lea Dekleva, record label representative Sanja Crnko and VJ Olgierd Kamienski. An IMAG camera mix of the live action was streamed to the side LED screens.

 

(Photos: Lumilas LLC)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Robe Esprites chosen for Vridilo Je Show in CroatiaRobe Esprites chosen for Vridilo Je Show in Croatia

WI Creations flies and moves ski lift for Moose Bar XXL

WI Creations flies and moves ski lift for Moose Bar XXL
WI Creations flies and moves ski lift for Moose Bar XXL

WI Creations used its new WImotion system - motors, tracking and control - to automate five ski lift cable cars for the Moose Bar XXL event at Antwerp, Belgium’s Sportpaleis venue.

 

The brainchild of organiser Yves Smolders, Moose Bar XXL ran for two nights this year after 2019’s inaugural event, and was attended by 20,000 party-people. A total of five cable cars were involved, sourced from an original ski lift in Tignes in the French Alps, and reconditioned and re-branded as Moose Bar props.

 

Four cable car gondolas were positioned in each corner of the Sportpaleis and these were flown up and down 6.5 metres into the venue ceiling throughout the evening, filled with guests, offering the opportunity for panoramic views of the event over the crowds. The fifth cable car was in the centre of the room and - in addition to moving up and down - it tracked up to 51 metres along the roof of the space, transporting performers between the multiple stages over 48 m.

 

The trussing for the tracking gondola was supplied by the production. The WI team, project managed by Jasper Mattijs, rigged their tracks and trolleys (one active, one passive) plus two 500 kg hosts and then picked up and attached the gondola. The other four gondolas were all rigged and flown in the same way - each suspended on two 500 kg WI-hoists attached to trussing in the roof.

 

Two WI Creations MCA control systems were utilised. The four corner gondolas were each controlled via a WI-Pad tablet running a pre-programmed sequence, with full e-Stop and Dead-Man’s-Handle capability. The operation of the four audience cable cars was overseen by event stewards who received induction and training ahead of the show. They were able to set the lifts in motion holding the Dead-Man’s Handle and activating the relevant motion cues straight from the pre-programmed WI-Pad.

 

The WI-Pads were supplied with USB WImotion dongle keys preventing any other actions than those designated to make the gondolas move up and down. This entire setup process was supervised by two WI operators. The tracking cable car was controlled via a WI-Desk programmed and operated by Lesly van Rompaey positioned at the side of the stage.

 

He worked in conjunction with three spotters to ensure everyone’s safety was always paramount as people boarded and alighted this gondola in different places throughout its journeys. WI also designed a consent procedure assisting the promoter’s safety management strategy and protecting members of the public wanting to engage in the cable car ride.

 

The other production elements - lighting, video, audio and rigging - were supplied by L&L Stage Services. Special effects were from Dewico and the end client was the House of Entertainment.

 

(Photos: Frank Lambrechts/Picturesk)

 

www.wicreations.com

 

WI Creations flies and moves ski lift for Moose Bar XXLWI Creations flies and moves ski lift for Moose Bar XXL

Christie Lites delivers lighting and crew for Cisco Live 2020

Christie Lites delivers lighting and crew for Cisco Live 2020
Christie Lites delivers lighting and crew for Cisco Live 2020

Technology experts from around the world descended on Barcelona for the annual Cisco Live EMEA conference in January 2020 to learn, share and drive our digital future.

 

For the third consecutive year, Christie Lites UK was commissioned by production company GPJ to design, supply and crew a lighting solution for the conference’s main stage and party area.

 

Christie Lites UK worked alongside production managers, technical managers and lighting designers to design the lighting and control package. This year, the team specified more than 850 fixtures and a crew of 27 experts, as thought leaders shared visions and performers including musician Nile Rodgers entertained the crowds.

 

GPJ’s Head of Technical Production, Mark Bannister, worked alongside GPJ Production Managers John Carss for the Main Plenary and Isobel Webb and Dave Whitty for the Party Area to realise the project. Christie Lites UK Account Rep Andy Strachan managed the delivery of the lighting solution to the event.

 

Lighting designer Simon Grant kick-started design concepts in response to the original brief from GPJ. He focused on the Party area, with 20 lighting crew. Grant used two of Christie Lites’ GrandMA3 consoles networked together to control the main stage and the Party space lighting. On the main stage, Christie Lites supplied a package of Martin MAC Viper Profile, MAC Viper Wash DX, GLP JDC1, GLP X4 Bar 20 and “a boat load” of Martin VDO Sceptron 10.

 

In the Party space were specified 170 VDO Sceptron, GLP JDC1 and Bar 20s, Martin MAC Viper fixtures including Performance, Profile and Wash DX models, along with Martin’s MAC Aura XB and MAC Encore Performance fixtures to light up the central bar, and a spattering of Prolights Eclipse FS for specials.

 

“The theme for the party was ‘music through the decades’,” Grant explains. “I took block colours as a simple way to deliver each decade. Inverted truss beams above the stage created a roof to the stage that raked up high above the audience. Using only four fixtures for the main stage kept the looks clean and simple.”

 

(Photos: Ben Phillips Photography)

 

www.christielites.com

 

Robe Esprites supplied to InfoSys Confluence event in Melbourne

Robe Esprites supplied to InfoSys Confluence event in Melbourne

Event production company Harry The Hirer Productions supplied 20 of its new Robe Esprite LED profile moving lights to this year’s 2-day APAC Confluence event for Indian multinational business consulting and IT specialist InfoSys.

 

The conference was staged at the Glasshouse, Olympic Park, Melbourne, and coincided with the finals of the 2020 Australian Open (AO) Tennis tournament. It highlighted InfoSys’s role as Digital Innovation Partner to the AO, and its enterprise uniting leading minds in business, technology and education to deliver novel, collaborative responses to some of the “great questions” of our time.

 

Harry The Hirer Productions supplied all production elements including furniture, signage and décor as well as all the straight technical disciplines - audio, lighting, video, staging and rigging.

 

The APAC Confluence main plenary session was in the venue’s largest space which has floor-to-ceiling windows along one side, which were blocked with a series of large shades. Lighting was specified by the project management team at Harry The Hirer Productions including operation manager Ian Kirkwood.

 

Fourteen of the 20 x Esprites were installed on two roof trusses running down the centre of the room, with six behind the 4-metre diameter circular stage, which was in front of a 16-meter curved LED wide-screen at the back. Lighting was programmed and operated for the event by Marcello “Cello” Mandrino who was using Esprites for the first time.

 

The plenary sessions were live-streamed and recorded on camera, so 3200 K was the goal for key lighting. The presentations all contained multiple graphics, so Mandrino had to balance the static lighting looks for each presenter to match the backdrop slides running throughout their presentation.

 

(Photos: Louise Stickland)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Robe Esprites supplied to InfoSys Confluence event in MelbourneRobe Esprites supplied to InfoSys Confluence event in Melbourne

Corona: Events United and Chauvet enhance Central Church Easter services for streaming

Corona: Events United and Chauvet enhance Central Church Easter services for streaming
Corona: Events United and Chauvet enhance Central Church Easter services for streaming

Out of concern for the well-being of worshippers in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, Executive Pastor Josh Parker and his team at Augusta, Maine-based Central Church closed their building to the public and began livestreaming their Saturday evening and Sunday services, including a special production at Easter.

 

“During Easter we always look for creative ways to reach more people by expanding production,” says Pastor Parker. “Once it became clear we would not be able to hold our usual Easter services, we started searching for innovative ways to improve our online production level.” As Tim Messina and his team from Events United provided an online recording option for churches and events at their space in Studio Lab, “it became clear to us that this was our Easter service solution,” he continues.

 

On March 29, Pastor Parker, along with a group of associate pastors and musicians, took to the Virtual Event Stage set up at the Events United Studio Lab to record a special service that was shared on Facebook and YouTube on Easter Sunday. “The majority of our services, including the worship and sermon, were recorded at their studio,” he says. “We also incorporated some additional pre-produced welcome, invitation, and music videos that were done in-house, but the impactful moments were created at Events United.”

 

Events United’s collection of over 100 Chauvet Professional fixtures included Maverick MK2 Spot, Ovation ellipsoidals, and Ovation Cyc 1 FC units as well as F2 video panels. Positioned on eight vertical uprights located four apiece on each side of the stage as well as on two overhead rows of truss, the fixtures enveloped the stage in light for the more intense moments of the service, while also providing specials for individual performers and soft washes for more reflective periods. “We have been using variations of this rig for videoing church services since the pandemic started. In this case, we added four Strike 4s,” says Jon Martell, Production Design Manager at Events United.

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Chauvet

Junior ESC mit TurboRays von High End Systems

Junior ESC mit TurboRays von High End Systems
Junior ESC mit TurboRays von High End Systems

Bei der 17. Ausgabe des Junior Eurovision Song Contest (JESC) im vergangenen Jahr kamen TurboRay-Scheinwerfer von High End Systems zum Einsatz. Der in der Arena von Gliwice, Polen, ausgetragene Musik-Wettbewerb mit neunzehn Teilnehmern im Alter zwischen neun und vierzehn Jahren wurde live im Fernsehen übertragen.

 

Die von Giorgos Stylianou-Matsis entworfene Bühne bot ein Design mit einem an einen schwebenden Kinderdrachen erinnernden LED-Bandelement. Insgesamt 26 TurboRays sorgten für die Lichteffekte auf der Bühne.

 

„Ich wollte einen Scheinwerfer, der das Dekor auf der Bühne akzentuiert“, erklärt Lichtchef Adam Tyska von TVP SA. „Für diese spezielle Produktion mit noch eher kleinen Künstlerinnen und Künstlern musste man andere Kameraeinstellungen wählen. Die TurboRay-Scheinwerfer passten in diesen Rahmen.“ Die 26 TurboRays wurden von Heli Showequipment aus Bodenheim für den JESC geliefert.

 

(Fotos: Infolight.pl)

 

www.highend.com

 

Junior ESC mit TurboRays von High End SystemsJunior ESC mit TurboRays von High End Systems

Innovative Show Design’s Elation rig at College Football Awards on ESPN

On December 12, college football’s most talented student-athletes were recognized at the 2019 Home Depot College Football Awards presented live on ESPN from the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Justin Garrone and production design firm Innovative Show Design (ISD) have been involved in the show since 2012 and again produced visuals for the 2019 edition, employing a setup that featured 90% Elation Professional products, comprising 58 x Rayzor 760, 23 x Satura Profile, 44 x Platinum Beam 5R Extreme, 24 x Design Wash LED 60, 16 x ACL 360i, 44 x SixPar 100, 7 x CuePix Panel, 3 x Colour Chorus 72, and 261 x EVLED 1024 SMD 20 mm LED panels.

 

This was Innovative Show Design’s 8th year doing the College Football Awards and 5th year since it moved to the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta. ISD served as a one-stop-shop for ESPN for the production, handling every aspect of the show from the first truck’s arrival to the last truck’s departure.

 

ISD created and managed all lighting, scenic and graphics, handled complete fabrication and installation of the set and was also responsible for all logistics involved with the production inclusive of project management.

 

Asked by ESPN to update the design and modernize it scenically, as well as help with the reverse shots into the audience, ISD changed the sets configuration, and added 36 linear light boxes to accommodate the request. Lighting supply for the event was by CYM Lighting Services of Thousand Palms, CA, a company that ISD has worked with for years.

 

The Awards show took place in a long yet narrow windowed room in the Hall of Fame, a turfed area scaled to nearly the size of half a football field and used by visitors to throw and kick footballs. “The most important task for the rig was to be functional and flexible for multi-point/multi source TV light,” says Garrone.

 

Lining the tunnel entrance and main staircase of the stage, the Rayzor 760s projected a team color with a sparkle effect rotating around the fixtures. Garrone also created custom pixel chases for the team wins.

 

Used for main key lights both front and back, audience specials, as well as main key lights for talent standups were Elation Satura Profile LED movers while Platinum Beam 5R Extreme moving heads provided beam lights for air effects and team win ballyhoos.

 

Elation’s ACL 360i single beam effect lights were incorporated as background lights with SixPar 100 LED Par lights used for architectural lighting highlights. CuePix Panels were used to cap the end of trusses that were in camera shots. A 60’ wide x 19.7’ tall LED wall covering the room’s glass windows was made up of 261 Elation EVLED 1024 SMD 20 mm LED panels.

 

Justin Garrone worked with lighting programmer Andrew Giffin, lighting/rigging TD Kevin Swank, red carpet lighting director John Lotz, artistic director Chris Runnells (ISD), creative director Nate Mitchell (ISD), and lead fabricator/scenic installer David Barber (ISD). The electricians were Ignacio Sanchez, Tony Mora, Mikey Pacilio, Max Vigil, Anthony Miller, David Ruiz, and Leo Garcia, with Chris Wagner and Greg Hays being the master electricians.

 

Garrone would also like to take the opportunity to bring attention to Kevin and Colleen Swank of CYM Lighting who are dedicated to the AIDS/LifeCycle (ALC) charity event, whose aim is to reduce new HIV infections and improve the quality of life for people living with HIV/AIDS.

 

“From May 31st through June 6th, they both will be riding their bikes with their Desert Roadrunners team 545 miles on a life-changing ride, not race, from San Francisco to Los Angeles to support and raise awareness to end the stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS and honor those who have passed from AIDS-related causes,” he says. Information can be found at www.aidslifecycle.org.

 

www.elationlighting.com

www.ishowdesign.com

www.cymlighting.com

 

Robe sponsors Signal Festival of Digital Arts

Robe was a sponsor of the 2019 Signal Festival in Prague, Czech Republic, a multi-platform event celebrating the fusion of digital arts and technology. A series of lighting and video installations turned a series of sites, areas and buildings across the Czech Republic’s capital into temporary gallery spaces for four days - created with multiple lightsources, video mapping, large format laser projections, moving light performances, etc.

 

London-based visual artist and creative technologist Memo Akten utilised 32 x Robe MegaPointes to create an installation called ‘Simple Harmonic Motion for Lights at the Czech Museum of Music’, a fluid and reflective work in the main hall of the Czech Museum of Music in Prague’s Mala Strana. The building, formerly the Baroque church of St. Mary Magdalene, was built in the 17th century.

 

While the MegaPointes were at the heart of the artwork, the airy interior was low-lit with 8 x Robe Divine 160 RGBW LED wash lights and 14 x RobeStrobes. The cathedral-like environs provided the setting for Akten’s large-scale project which was specially commissioned for this festival. It was the first time he’s combined the mediums of video projection and lighting together in an installation.

 

Akten needed a high-ceilinged building with the right spatial dimensions in which to stage the piece. As it is also essentially a musical work - the soundscape is created by an algorithm based on computational maths - he thought it an appropriate location. He has developed the custom software used to generate the soundscape and control/trigger the lighting and the projected video content from open source code.

 

Memo Akten’s ‘Simple Harmonic Motion…’ (SHM) is a series of site-specific installations that started in 2011 with a combined audio/video installation including live performance by 16 drummers. This Signal Festival presentation was the eighth version of a constantly evolving idea.

 

The MegaPointes were rigged on a central truss supported by a 4-legged ground support, 11 metres high and 18 metres long. While most of the lighting looks were in variations of white, a few blips into other colours were effective, so having a unit with CMY colour mixing helped these transitions.

 

Prompted by the algorithm, the light beams swung around the hall like giant pendulums, all slightly out of sync and running at different speeds and trajectories - but every five minutes the algorithmic timing was tuned to sync all 32 MegaPointes, bringing them into unison for a split-second.

 

At that point, the RobeStrobes and Divine 160s grazing up the walls momentarily emitted a strobe-like flash highlighting the whole interior. The first visual element seen by the audience on walk-in was the liquid fractal geometry and patterns made by the video projection onto a screen in an elevated altar-like position on the wall opposite.

 

Robe also supplied six BMFLs, Divine 160s and haze and fog machines to another Signal 2019 project - an AV performance piece involving organ and synthesised music, ‘Signal Soundscape: Inner Land Study 1’ by Czech artists Tereza Bartunkova, Stepan Hejzlar, Oliver Torr and Ondrej Merta, staged at the Kostel U Salvátora in the Old Town.

 

(Photos: Tomas Slavik/Dusan Vondra/Jan Hromadko/Jiri Sebek) 

 

www.robe.cz

 

Painting with Light supports Wintergloed event in Bruges

Painting with Light (PWL) created a 2-kilometre walk-through lighting and visual ‘experience’ in the centre of Belgian city Bruges - a UNESCO World Heritage Site - to add atmosphere and luminosity for the festive ‘Wintergloed’ (Winter Glow) season.

 

Commissioned by Bruges Plus, the organisation responsible for the town’s cultural events, PWL’s winning pitch was led by Peter van den Bosch (business unit manager for leisure and entertainment) and lighting expert Iiris Rousku who designed the various lighting artworks with their team.

 

It comprised a series of different lighting and projection-mapped installations, located in six different areas. Different approaches were taken for each work - some could be observed, some could be touched and interacted with and others were fully immersive.

 

This, the first edition of Wintergloed included the lighting of pathways, waterways, streets, buildings and monuments, trees and foliage, bridges and numerous other spaces and objects along the route, plus a special custom construction - The Cathedral - built in the Station Square, which was lit and projection-mapped.

 

One goal of the overall scheme was enabling visitors to view each piece of art from different angles. Part of the brief involved encouraging people to walk via Minnewater (Lake of Love) into the city rather than along the street directly from the station.

 

Projection mapping was involved in two of the installations, the Station Square and the 19 metre high Poertoren Tower. An enormous moon was projected onto the tower using a Panasonic RZ projector linked to a Christie Coolux media server. This projection showcased the cycle of the moon over a 12-minute timeframe.

 

The Station Square installation was very prominent. The Cathedral is built from a combined wooden/tented structure comprising four arched ends which are 10 metres square and 11 metres high. PWL chose the structure for its aesthetics and as a practical solution to house the video projection system. The team designed the custom print on the outer skins.

 

The full ceiling expanse and all the walls above 4 metres were filled with projections from five Panasonic PT-RQ32 machines rigged inside the structure, crossing over to project on the opposite walls, with the fifth one beaming up into the vaulted roof.

 

Video content was stored on one of PWL’s Disguise D3 4x4 media servers and included drawings and artwork collected from local schoolchildren based on the topic of ‘magical winter animals’. These were coordinated by PWL and Bruges Plus who liaised with local schools. Over 294 kids participated and could see their drawings “fall” from the sky inside the Cathedral ceiling, and selected images were highlighted each day.

 

In the evening, content transformed into a ‘dynamic galaxy’ created by the motion captured movement of people walking inside and outside the tent caught by a motion Kinekt sensor positioned on top of the tent. This galaxy was displayed each day between 7 p.m. and midnight - when the installations were powered off for the night. The projection elements were installed by Vidi-Square and this part of the Wintergloed 2019 was sponsored by Panasonic.

 

The cathedral was lit using Chauvet Colordash Batten-Quad 12 LED battens positioned all around in a curtain of light effect. Robe iPointes were rigged outside the structure to accentuate its central position and draw visitors from other points around the city.

 

A major part of the initial Wintergloed concept was to involve local artists and talent in dynamic and engaging ways. PWL and Bruges Plus also invited selected local street artists to express their creativity using the Cathedral as a canvas - but instead of painting with aerosol cans they were doing it with light and via VR.

 

The artists painted in the VR environment (The Cathedral) wearing the goggles and their artwork was projected on the ceiling and walls in real-time so the audience could see the process. PWL created special ‘light’ brushes with different colours and textures the artists could use in the VR world, and as the results were being projected (which is a light source) it was literally painting with light.

 

“The Bridge” was a light art installation created using 400 x SGM LT-200 3D LED pixel tubes each measuring 2 metres. These IP65 rated products were rigged in a specially fabricated roof structure rig supported by a double right-angled goalpost trussing structure stood in a pond in Bruges’ King Albert I park.

 

Patterns flowing through the tubes were activated by video content fed from a Christie Coolux media server and could be triggered by passers-by putting their hands inside a podium fitted with a sensor. Colours and patterns could be shifted by their hand movements.

 

“The Gate” was inspired by gates in the city and along the Wintergloed route. This piece featured ten partial gates made from custom-made LED pixel profiles arranged to play with perspective and create a tunnel effect along the narrow lane in which they were located. PWL commissioned Belgian company Epix to fabricate the custom gates clad in LED pixels which were controlled via three networked Invent Design Digidot C4 Extended pixel controllers.

 

There were many other eye-catching works in this extravaganza of light including “The Source”, a geometric work comprising 30 x LED strings each with 150 pixels spanning an 18 x 23 metre gap across the Minnewater lake between the city’s ice-skating rink and winter terrace.

 

Iiris Rousku and Peter van den Bosch were joined for two weeks on site by Ashwin Coelho, Katleen Selleslagh, Arthur Claesen, Jos Claesen, Martijn Smolders and Dorian Stevens from PWL. The technical production manager was Sam Van Maele from EVM who came onboard as soon as the scheme was green-lighted by the City. They worked alongside crew from several different rental companies involved in supplying and installing the equipment including Panasonic, John & Jane, EVM, 71 Rentals, Epix Invent Design and Screenit.

 

(Photos: Kris Van De Sande)

 

www.paintingwithlight.com

 

Barco projectors and Modulo Pi media servers create New Year’s Eve show in Paris

Barco projectors and Modulo Pi media servers create New Year’s Eve show in Paris
Barco projectors and Modulo Pi media servers create New Year’s Eve show in Paris

On December 31, 2019, more than 400.000 people gathered on the Champs-Elysées avenue in Paris to celebrate New Year’s Eve. For the 6th year in a row, this avenue shone brightly for New Year’s Eve celebrations.

 

After winning the tender launched by the city of Paris, Cookies Production produced a sound and light show using fifteen of Barco’s video-projectors and four Modulo Player media servers by Modulo Pi. The show - projected on the Arc de Triomphe - included music, video mapping, and pyrotechnics.

 

Cookies Production worked with Magnum for the technical production, and the creative studios Holymage and Spectre Lab for the artistic direction and production.

 

In terms of technical set-up, fifteen Barco UDX video-projectors were used for the show. “We reached about 470.000 lumens, and more than 300 lux per square meter. This was a first for the Arc de Triomphe,” comments Christophe Gillier, CEO of Cookies Production.

 

The video-projectors were fed by four Modulo Player Pro media servers which were used for video mapping and show playback. The Modulo Player Pros were equipped to receive timecode: “Modulo Player’s capability to work with timecode is essential in a show that must strictly follow the countdown. It also ensures the synchronization of the video, light, firework, and laser effects,” states Baptiste Jazé, media server operator on the show.

 

In addition, Modulo Player’s LED mapping function allowed to convert video content into DMX. This way, the creative studios could work on the lights located underneath the Arc de Triomphe’s vault at the same time as video effects, ensuring video and light were synced.

 

The show - including the countdown to 2020, marked by a  firework with 2.700 shots - was filmed by six cameras and displayed live on four giant screens placed along the Champs Elysées avenue.

 

(Photos: Serge Decoster/Barco/Modulo Pi)

 

www.modulo-pi.com

 

Barco projectors and Modulo Pi media servers create New Year’s Eve show in ParisBarco projectors and Modulo Pi media servers create New Year’s Eve show in Paris

Ayrton Perseo supports Castle of Light in Edinburgh

Through November and December 2019, the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, was treated to the inaugural Castle of Light, a celebratory visualisation of Edinburgh’s history portrayed by a combination of mapping, projection, lighting and audio. As part of the lighting design, nine of Ayrton’s Perseo-S fixtures were used, in particular during the finale of the promenade performance.

 

NL Productions (NLP) were part of a consortium that created the Castle of Light and Phil O’Halloran, MD of NLP and Technical Production Manager for the event, explains why the Perseo-S was the fixture of choice: “The Castle of Light show was a huge event for the city; the historical narrative was told through extensive mapping and video effects, culminating in the finale piece in the Castle’s Crown Square where we mapped the entire front façade of the Royal Palace.

 

“Five Perseo-S units were to be rigged on the Palace roof with two more on the left and right PA towers at ground level. We had a very limited amount of power available in such an inaccessible location so the LED engine was a must.”

 

Together with the other members of the production consortium - War Productions, Double Take Projections and Andy McGregor Design - and with support from Ambersphere Solutions and Impact Production Services (IPS), NLP went through a shoot-out process to judge which luminaire would be best suited to this application and Perseo-S came out on top.

 

(Photos: Adam Robertson)

 

www.ayrton.eu

 

Lightswitch, 4Wall and Elation team up at LA Auto Show

Lightswitch, 4Wall and Elation team up at LA Auto Show
Lightswitch, 4Wall and Elation team up at LA Auto Show

Design group Lightswitch first turned to Elation Professional’s Fuze Wash 575 LED white light luminaire in 2017 and again utilized the auto show-optimized moving head to light three auto manufacturer booths at the 2019 edition of the LA Auto Show.

 

“The Fuze Wash 575 is one of a very small number of automated LED fixtures that we use extensively in the auto show market,” states Chris Medvitz, Partner and Principal at Lightswitch.

 

Held November 22-December 1 at the LA Convention Center, Lightswitch used the Fuze Wash 575 on the Subaru, Nissan and Infiniti booths. Medvitz designed the booth lighting working with booth designers George P. Johnson on the Nissan and Infiniti booths, and designers EWI Worldwide/Hansen Productions on the Subaru booth.

 

Some 775 Elation Fuze Wash 575 and 75 Elation Artiste Picasso fixtures were used on the show, supplied by 4Wall Entertainment. Other booths lit using the Fuze Wash 575 include Honda, Volkswagen and Acura with the latter also utilizing the Artiste Picasso.

 

Some 96 of the Fuze Wash 575 units were used on the Subaru booth for launch of the new 2020 Subaru Outback, an immersive National Park-themed environment that Lightswitch helped design.

 

www.elationlighting.com

 

Lightswitch, 4Wall and Elation team up at LA Auto ShowLightswitch, 4Wall and Elation team up at LA Auto Show